Morning Hits: Carl Crawford, Utility Infielders, and Feds

In case you missed it, the biggest news of the morning is the Yankees decision to waive Chad Gaudin, thus eliminating him from the fifth starter competition and probably from the team altogether.

Here are some other news items of note:

  • Jon Heyman wrote a column on Carl Crawford and he had a quote that the  Yankees “absolutely love Crawford” and we should expect him to be the team’s no. 1 target next offseason. He also said that the Rays had been trying to lock Crawford up all offseason, but failed to do so making it seem likely that Crawford is destined for the free agent market.
  • The Yankees cut a pair of utility infielders yesterday who were fighting for a bench spot on the Yankees roster, Eduardo Nunez and Reegie Corona. That leaves just Ramiro Pena and Kevin Russo as the final two utility infielders left in camp. Many people have assumed Pena will get the job, but I’ve always thought Russo had a better chance than people let on. Could he make the Yankees roster over Pena?
  • Alex Rodriguez will met with federal investigators this Friday in Buffalo, NY. He is just a witness in a case and is seemingly in no danger of being prosecuted for anything. Of course there is always perjury, so hopefully he’ll be good. We should also be hopeful that this will be the only time he has to talk with Feds and that this won’t carry over into the season.
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One Response to Morning Hits: Carl Crawford, Utility Infielders, and Feds

  1. smurfy says:

    Yesterday’s game was a ton o’ fun, with Burnett, Hamels, Hughes and Bastardo pitching, and the wind a blowing lotsa balls to the wall and beyond.

    Glad to see Ramiro Pena with a couple right-handed hits, one with authority. That one Jayson Werth misplayed into a triple, doing his impression of chasing the chicken around the barnyard.

    Kevin Russo made a fine stop at third, in between hop, and he smoked a couple liners, sounded like a live piece o’ lumber. Eduardo Nunez may have already been cut, but he played second much better than I had seen: took command on a twisty popup woulda been difficult for Tex, and intercepted a grounder in the hole, yet didn’t take the easy out at first, but spun quickly to get the runner at second. And, he hit one over their heads at a timely time. He’ll be back!