Yankees 2010 9th Round Draft Pick: Taylor Morton

Name: Taylor Morton
POS: RHP
Ht: 6’3″
Wt: 194
B/T: R/R
DOB: 12-18-91
School level: HS

In the ninth round the Yankees selected another high schooler. This time it was 18-year-old right handed pitcher Taylor Morton out of Bartlett High School in Tennessee. He caught in high school, but those days appear to be behind him and he is currently committed to the University of Tennessee so it could take a little bit of money to get him to sign.

Here is what Baseball America had to say about him:

Righthander Morton, a Tennessee signee, pushed Ray as the state’s top prep prospect, pitching at 92-93 mph during an up-and-down spring. He attracted plenty of scouting attention last summer, touching 94-95 mph at times, but reports of similar velocity this spring were scarce, and his velocity was all over the board. Morton has good size at 6-foot-3, 200 pounds, and he has shown aptitude with his changeup, including striking out Bryce Harper last summer during USA Baseball’s Tournament of Stars with three straight changes. His curve needs more power, which could come with experience. Morton has been a catcher as a prep as well but profiles best as a pitcher.

MLB.com also had a short snippet about him:

Morton earned All-Metro and All-District Honors in 2009 and was selected a First-Team Preseason Rawlings All-American prior to the 2010 campaign. He committed to play at the University of Tennessee.

River Ave Blues wrote this about him before the draft:

Morton made a bit of a name for himself during last summer’s Tournament of Stars showcase event by striking out Bryce Harper, but he was an interesting prospect long before that garnered him some attention. Listed at a sturdy 6-foot-2, 190 lbs, Morton sits in the low-90’s with his fastball and has dialed it up as high as 95 on occasion, and there’s reason to believe he’ll add more velocity as he fills out. Unlike most high schoolers, his best secondary pitch is circle change that comes in around the high-70’s and fades away from lefties, and he also offers a loopy low-70’s curveball that he’ll need to tightened up.

Morton’s strength is his strong command, which stems from his athleticism and ability to repeat a sound delivery. He’s unique considering that most prep pitchers have nothing that resembles a changeup when they turn pro, so that hurdle has already been cleared. Given the Yanks historical success with teaching their prospects curveballs, there’s hope for his third pitch. Committed to Tennessee, Morton is expected to hear his named called somewhere in the 5th or 6th round.

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