4 Former Yankees Including The Boss on Hall of Fame Veterans Ballot

The ballot for the Hall of Fame veterans committee was announced today and the biggest name on it was “The Boss” George Steinbrenner who past away last July.

Joining him on the the 12-man ballot were former Yankees Billy Martin, Ron Guidry, and Tommy John.

The winners will be announced on December 6 at the winter meetings. To get elected candidates must get at least 75 percent of the votes on a 16-member board. It’s hard to say whether or not Steinbrenner will get the votes or not.

Martin played for 11 seasons from 1950 until 1961. As a player he wasn’t outstanding offensively, but he was considered a tremendous defensive player and the author Peter Golenbach credited him with being one of the keys to the Yankees dynasty of the early 50′s. As a manager Martin won one World Series and an AL Pennant. His career winning percentage was just .553, but he is still considered one of the best in game tacticians ever.

Guidry played his entire 14 year career with the Yankees. His 9-year stretch from 1977 until 1985 was simply amazing. He went 154-67 with a 3.15 ERA during that stretch. His best season, 1978, was among the most elite seasons ever when he went 25-3 with a 1.74 ERA.

John is mostly known for having a surgery named after him (he was the first player to undergo what has become a common modern sugery). He played with the Yankees from 1980-1982 and then rejoined the team in 1986 and finally retired a Yankee in 1989. He was a four time All-Star and a three time 20 game winner, two of which were with the Yankees.

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4 Responses to 4 Former Yankees Including The Boss on Hall of Fame Veterans Ballot

  1. Jason says:

    I guess Roger Maris will never get in huh?

  2. It doesn't look good. As great as Maris was, he suffered too many injuries to get in.

  3. MikeD says:

    A career winning percentage of .553 is actually very good. At the very least, it's not a reason for him not to get elected.

    Martin is probably one of the few managers who demonstrated a clear ability to make a team better when he first takes them over, and there's been a few studies that show his teams produced higher winner percentages than their collective parts. Yet his downside is well known, too. He'd eventually wear out his welcome, never allowing him to have a consistent and long enough run on one team.

    It's odd. I do think he was one of the better managers in the game. Yet he didn't do quite enough to overcome the negatives, so I say pass.