Robinson Cano Didn’t Sign with Boras for an Extension

Robinson CanoVia George King of the NY Post:

“No, I would never do that,” Cano said of asking Boras to talk to the Yankees about a new deal. “I came here to focus on playing baseball.”

Cano, 28, was the last Yankee to arrive in camp because he got the reporting date and the first full-squad workout date — yesterday — confused.

So why did Cano leave Bobby Barad for the high-profile Boras if it wasn’t to seek an extension?

“He has a great company and can do things for you on and off the field,” Cano said. “I am not thinking about a big contract.”

I don’t see why the reporters are taking the story in this direction. So what if Robinson Cano wants to sign an extension? He’s the best young second baseman in baseball. Wouldn’t they want that?

Besides, Boras’ reputation is that his players don’t sign extensions. The way he normally operates is to wait to hit the open market so that way there are more bidders to drive the price up.

It would be in Cano’s favor to seek an extension now as he is coming off the best season of his career. Which is probably why these reporters are taking it this way. I just don’t see it though as players don’t go to Boras to stay with their team. They do it to get as much money as possible once they hit free agency.

Just look at two Boras clients, Prince Fielder and Jered Weaver. Both are free agents after this season. Both teams would love to retain their players and the Angels certainly have the money to do re-sign him now. But neither players have engaged their teams seriously in renegotiating now and both with hit the free agent market.

Cano will earn $10 million this season and has a $14 million and $15 million team option for 2012 and 2013 respectively. Then he’ll hit the free agent market and the bidding will probably start at $100 million.

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3 Responses to Robinson Cano Didn’t Sign with Boras for an Extension

  1. Hardcore Yankee Fan says:

    Not only have the Yankees had a steadfast philosophy in not signing extensions, which I'm sure you are already aware of, but there is absolutely no reason to do so in the case of Cano who is under team control for 3 more years. Cano would have to do at least what he did this year or better for the next 3 years for the bidding to start at $100 million. And even if he does, as a 31 year old 2nd baseman, the $100 million isn't going to be a gimme either depending on what the market climate is at that time.

  2. For the record, the Yankees played up their "policy" of not extending players before their contract comes up for Jeter. I don't think it was exactly a steadfast policy before that. In fact, they've already signed Cano to an extension once. His two option years bought out some of his free agency.

  3. Hardcore Yankee Fan says:

    I think it's a different issue when you're dealing with players who are arbitration or pre arbitration players. For instance, if Hughes has another solid season, it would be very wise to give him a long term deal, risking something but paying a lot less down the road should Hughes maintain his level of play or improve. Same for Cano. The extension wasn't signed in the midst of a large contract for a free agent type player. In fact, I can't recall any player they signed to an extension that had 6+ years, though they've had plenty of opportunities in the past 15 years (Bernie, Matsui, Jeter, Posada, Rivera, etc., etc.).