Paul O’Neill To Increase Time on YES

Via Neil Best of Newsday:

[Paul O’Neill] has been popular among viewers since he started broadcasting soon after retiring. But he has determinedly refused to make it a full-time second career.

There was too much catching up to do on family time back home near Cincinnati and too little taste for returning to the long baseball grind.

But with his second son heading off to college and only a high school-age daughter left at home, O’Neill budged this season. After years of limiting himself to about 20 games, he will roughly double that, with 14 games in June alone, including the Yankees ‘ visit to Cincinnati.

Might that number grow even more when he becomes an empty-nester in a few years?

“Not to the point of making it an everyday job,” he said before last Wednesday’s game against the Blue Jays . “I don’t ever see myself doing 162 games. But I could see myself doing 80 or something.”

This is great news for us fans who love listening to him call the games on the YES Network. No, he doesn’t provide much in the way of analysis and or even a rudimentary understanding of modern statistics, but his way of calling the game is quite charming.

If we are lucky the Yankees will make an effort in balancing out his act with David Cone, who has a much more solid grasp of sabermetrics, to offset O’Neill.

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6 Responses to Paul O’Neill To Increase Time on YES

  1. Ugh. I know I'm in the minority here but I really don't like when O'Neill is in the booth, especially if Kay is with him. They talk about almost anything BUT the game and it's incredibly frustrating to listen to.

    • Certainly true that Kay does tend to get off topic. More Kay's fault than O'Neill's though. I think that's mostly Kay's fault though. He always seems so excited around O'Neill because all he's ever wanted was an athlete to like him.

  2. Mike Sommer says:

    "he doesn’t provide much in the way of analysis and or even a rudimentary understanding of modern statistics, but his way of calling the game is quite charming."

    Thought you were describing the Scooter….

    • Exactly, Scooter wasn't much in the way of analysis, but he brought a certain charm to the game that lightened it up a bit. Baseball is pretty monotonous sometimes and we need some humor to break it up.

  3. i just said that on another forum. Oneil reminds me of scooter

  4. Freddie says:

    Paul you haven't lost a step. You are still as slow as you have ever been.