Yankees notes and tidbits on the trade market

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With the trade deadline a mere three days away, here are the latest trade rumors, notes and tidbits surrounding the Yankees.

— The Yankees are still interested in John Danks and he continues to be a top possibility for the ball club, reports Jon Heyman. The Yankees were discussing a potential deal with the White Sox last week but the trade talks haven’t increased since then.

— As of yesterday, the Yankees aren’t talking to the Padres about a possible deal for Ian Kennedy, although it would seem Kennedy could be the perfect fit.

— The Yankees also aren’t interested in talks to acquire Cliff Lee, considering he just came off the disabled list. If the Yankees do want a chance to acquire Lee, they could do it through waivers in August.

— The Yankees aren’t interested in A.J. Burnett.

— If the Yankees are interested in Jon Lester, they are more likely to sign him in the offseason rather than trade for him as a rental.

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7 Responses to Yankees notes and tidbits on the trade market

  1. Balt Yank says:

    Danks is a bad choice as 2010 was his last decent + season and he has 3 years left on the contract. No more high priced pitchers (Jon Lester).

  2. hotdog says:

    Lester appears to have a very strong desire to continue playing with Boston…i would not be surprised if he gets traded to a team that gives up a big name prospect plus and that Lester re-signs with Boston next year at a discount…money talks but I would not be surprised if the Red Sox come up with a great prospect and Lester in 2015…

  3. Peter Russo says:

    John Lester will not be a Yankee if the red Sox did that their fans will never forgive them an arch rival what would the Red Sox want in return? First, if the Red Sox trade him the team would have to give up a top prospect. Yankees fan forget it this will never happen.

  4. tomy cassella says:

    the yanks will get jon lester when hell freezes over.

  5. Wayne says:

    I'm constantly amazed when I read a comment like this about trading for Ian Kennedy: "it would seem Kennedy could be the perfect fit." No, he would not be a perfect fit, he'd be a misfit because he's been consistently bad against AL clubs.

    Kennedy is strictly an NL pitcher, and his HR numbers went down this year only because he’s pitching in pitcher-friendly Petco park.

    At the very best, Kennedy is a #5 starter in the AL (if that), and he’s an ass on top of that. Here’s his stats against the AL from 2011-2013:

    vs. CLE, 4.50 ERA, 1 HR, 8 H, 8 IP

    vs. KC , 6.10 ERA, 2 HR, 16 H, 10.1 IP

    vs. LAA, 2.25 ERA, 1 HR, 6 H, 8 IP

    vs. MIN, 4.70 ERA, 2 HR, 6 H, 7.2 IP

    vs. OAK, 11.12 ERA, 2 HR, 10 H, 5.2 IP

    vs. TB , 5.40 ERA, 1 HR, 6 H, 5 IP

    vs. TEX, 9.53 ERA, 1 HR, 10 H, 5.2 IP

    That’s 10 HRs and 62 hits in 50.1 IP against AL opponents!

    And it’s not like this is anything new for Kennedy; he’s regularly gotten his butt handed to him by AL teams and good NL teams. And he hasn’t fared much better this year in three outings against the AL, giving up 20 hits in 18.2 IP.

    So, for the love of God, NEVER mention Kennedy’s name ever again as a trade target. He’s basically a fair-skinned version of Nuno.

    People who write about the Yankees & fans alike should check out any NL pitchers' stats against the AL before they suggest trading for an NL pitcher. NL lineups, by-in-large, are VASTLY inferior to AL lineups. And it's not simply a matter that they face a weak-hitting pitcher 2 or 3 times a game: the 8th place hitters in most NL lineups are almost as bad as the pitchers and the bench players are typically well below AL standards, which means most NL starters face 5-8 relatively easy outs a game (if they go 8 or more innings).

    In this age of "advanced metrics," it amazes me that people still ignore the most obvious metrics when "scouting" NL players. That is, the difference between the AL and NL is substantial, and the ballpark adjustment figures (and other adjustments) do not some close to reflecting the true differences between the two leagues.